Weekly Photo Challenge: Alphabet

In response to the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Alphabet

There are dozens of Alphabets in use today, the most popular being the Latin alphabet (which was derived from the Greek). Many languages use modified forms of the Latin alphabet, with additional letters formed using diacritical marks. While most alphabets have letters composed of lines (linear writing), there are also exceptions such as the alphabets used in Braille, fingerspelling, and Morse code – thank you very much for that Wikipedia, but i think i will stick to vintage signs ….

 

Victorian Eye Chart
Victorian opticians sign England
Victorian Dentist Sign
Victorian dentist door sign England
Pullman Shield
The Pullman Shield. Pullman trains in Great Britain were mainline luxury railway services that operated with first-class coaches and a steward service, provided by the British Pullman Car Company The Pullman Car Company was formed in 1882 and named after the Pullman concept pioneered in the United States by the American railroader George Pullman. The first Pullman Railway Coach to enter service in the UK was in 1874.
Observer
ye olde victorian Workshop
British Phone Box
The red telephone box, a telephone kiosk for a public telephone designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, was a familiar sight on the streets of the United Kingdom, Malta, Bermuda and Gibraltar. Despite a reduction in their numbers in recent years, the traditional British red telephone box can still be seen in many places throughout the UK, and in current or former British colonies around the world. The colour red was chosen to make them easy to spot. From 1926 onwards, the fascias of the kiosks were emblazoned with a prominent crown, representing the British government. The red phone box is often seen as a British cultural icon throughout the world. Although production of the traditional boxes ended with the advent of the KX series in 1985, many still stand in Britain. The paint colour used is known as currant red and is defined by a British Standard, BS 381C-539
Vintage Sign
victorian station lamp and bovril sign
Vintage Signs
Worn Vintage Signs of Beamish irish stout and Roberts Tea
Travel by Train
victorian sign – a bracing day by the sea
Vintage Taxi Sign
Vintage Morris commercial taxi cab advert. Morris Commercial Cars Limited was a British manufacturer of commercial vehicles formed by William Morris, founder of Morris Motors Limited, to continue the business of E G Wrigley and Company which he purchased in 1924
Vintage Chocolate Vending
J. S. Fry & Sons, Ltd. was a British chocolate company owned by Joseph Storrs Fry and his family. The business went through several changes of name and ownership; it was named J. S. Fry & Sons in 1822. It eventually became a division of Cadburys.
Gold Flake
Victorian era Advertising sign
Vintage Signs
Victorian era Advertising signs
Llangollen Railway Station
3802 steam train at Llangollen Railway station, part of the old Ruabon to Barmouth Line, All the stations along the track are of a typical Victorian design and each station has been recreated in 1950’s Great Western colour scheme. It is currently the longest preserved standard gauge line in Wales
Station Sign
old steam loco and railway memorabilia
Beware
Old British beware train sign
Victorian Candle Shop
Victorian candle factory England
Vintage Signs
old Victorian era Advertising enamel signs
Pub Sign
Victorian pub sign England
Victorian Hospital Chair
Victorian Hospital adjustable eye test chair and solied dressing container
Victorian Butchers
Victorian Butchers Shop England
Old Signs
Victorian signs at a British train Station
Stop Sign
Stop sign at a snow covered country lane that’s all folks 🙂

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